Hawkeye: Freefall Mini-Series Review

Eternally popular in both print and live-action media, Clint Barton is once again on a one-man crusade to fight crime the only way he knows how – with increasingly perilous difficulty.

There is a lot of goodwill from fans when it comes to a new Hawkeye miniseries. With a history including stellar runs from Matt Fraction and David Aja in 2012 and then again in 2015 under Jeff Lemire and Ramon Perez, when this series was first announced last year fans hoped that Matthew Rosenberg and Otto Schmidt would be adding their names to that hallowed pantheon. And in many ways they do. In some others, however, not so much.

The premise of this new miniseries is straightforward enough to begin with – Parker Robbins, a.k.a. The Hood, is expanding his criminal drug empire and the corrupt authorities under mayor Wilson Fisk cannot be bothered to stop him. Enter Clint Barton, one of the few Avengers (West Coast or otherwise) who can still count himself as a street-level hero, the man on a mission who wants to see the streets of New York City cleaned up. Excellent, this sounds exactly like a classic ‘good guy versus bad guy turf war.’

Hawkeye: Freefall #1, courtesy of Marvel.com

The only problem with this is that The Hood is not just well-connected and an idiot, as Clint likes to remind us every now and again. He is downright formidable even to the strongest heroes on the block, and all Hawkeye has to his name are a bow and some arrows. Oh, and someone is impersonating his former Ronin persona and going after The Hood’s assets with a more violent plan of attack, so whoever this is probably needs to be taken down too. So a three-way turf war and six issues to tell it – this is going to be exciting.

Clint manages to get the better of Robbins at first, but not for long

And for the most part it is. There are a lot of action sequences, as well as a plethora of cool and interesting fight scenes involving The Hood’s supernatural abilities that are beautifully brought to life by penciller Otto Schmidt. However, a major drawback of this miniseries is that for something that only clocks in at around 120 pages in length it becomes needlessly convoluted around the halfway point. This unfortunately hampers the narrative a great deal as time needs to be spent explaining plot twists that weren’t necessary in the first place – time which is in short supply.

As it transpires, it is Clint himself who is donning the Ronin costume while pretending to be a mysterious newcomer who is capable of fending off the likes of Bucky, Falcon, and even Spider-Man. He is doing this so that he can secretly pick-off a number of The Hood’s assets in secret (with some uncharacteristically violent fallout) while still publicly striving to bring him to justice the legitimate way. Of course, Clint is Suspect Number One amongst the superhero community when his old alter-ego reappears on the scene, so the way he gives himself an alibi by being in two places at once is…a portable, one-hour-boomerang time machine.

On paper it is exactly the sort of comic book-y plot device you would expect to make an appearance, but in an otherwise grounded miniseries which shows the fallout of Clint’s many mistakes and the toll each and every encounter with The Hood is taking on his body it just feels out of place. When the device breaks and is impossible to repair by his new seventeen-year-old former-criminal tech expert you would assume that the narrative would return to its original premise, but instead even more time is spent finding ways to continue the by now eye-rolling ruse.

Not the sort of behaviour that you would expect from a (sometimes) well-respected Avenger

Still, this miniseries deserves a lot more than just complaints. By the time Bullseye comes onto the scene in the third act the stakes have well and truly been raised, and there are a number of casualties which weigh heavily on Clint’s conscience. This serves as a much-needed wake-up call for the purple archer and narrows his focus to the original goal – put a stop to The Hood’s criminal activity. The final issue concludes on a sombre note in contrast to the rest of the miniseries, and teases a premise which could very well be the basis of a fascinating follow-up series. As far as this one goes, however, it doesn’t quite reach the heights that one of Clint’s arrows could.

Presenting an interesting premise and hosting an all-star supporting cast, Hawkeye: Freefall offers gorgeous artwork, thrills and laughs throughout, and also a solid ending. However, its unnecessarily convoluted plot and slump around the middle take points off it and makes it miss the mark which Clint would normally nail even with his eyes closed.

Final Score: 7/10

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